Week 5&6 – Rapid Impact Assessment

A lot to write about, but I have combined the two weeks into one post, as I have had two, two day weeks on the trot.

Week 5, Day 1 – Butterfly survey

Beautiful trip to Hartslock nature reserve, one of BBOWT’s steepest reserves in order to look for butterflies. It is still quite early for most species, but since it’s been so warm, there are a few that have started their flight seasons.

We saw beautiful Green Hairstreaks, Dingy Skippers, Brimstones, Orange tips and a Mother Shipton (which is a day-flying moth).

20170419_123713

It was a steep, hot, but rather fantastic day. It was nice to do a butterfly survey where we actually saw some butterflies, and gain some experience in identifying butterflies on the wing. I’m finding identifying the white butterflies particularly difficult, as when they’re flying, you can’t necessarily distinguish the delicacy of some of their markings.

I think the butterfly surveys are becoming one of my favourite surveys though. You’re always in beautiful countryside, usually with stunning views, and it helps that in order to carry out a survey, it has to be sunny!

We also saw the very beautiful Lady Orchid flowering, one of the first of the season, and it should be noted, that Hartslock nature reserve is one of the best places to see them.

20170419_124126

Week 5, Day 2 – Workshop Presentation

This day was a half day course on how to better be able to deliver presentations to a wide range of audiences. We had to bring in a personal object of some meaning to us, write down several good and bad points about how we communicate and prepare a short 5 minute presentation on a project that we were proud of.

This was a surprisingly good day. I wasn’t sure what to expect, as historically I haven’t enjoyed giving presentations. I amazed myself at how confident I was, though I put that down to the group being very small, and knowing most of them.

I chose to do my presentation on my masters dissertation project, where I was able to explain the history of the project, what I learned and why I was proud of my contribution. I tried to utilise some of the techniques that I was taught that day, such as how to hold the room and keep my body language confident by not shifting around. Minimising hand gestures, and maintaining eye contact were also very important, but I think the most useful thing that I was taught was how to embody confidence. We were told that a lot of people, such as actors or lecturers, envisage a circle on the floor where they will be standing for the presentation, and project good feeling into the circle, such as confidence, relaxation etc, and then when you walk into that space you feel the things that you have previously projected into the space. It is a very simple mind trick, but it works wonders!

Another important point, was that we were told to think carefully about our audience. So before you even add information to your presentation, do some background planning on your audience. Find out how to capture their attention, keep their attention, your method of delivery – what does your audience want from your presentation. After you’ve done that, introduce your subject to your planning, and make a list of questions you want yo answer and bear in mind as you write your presentation. Finally, you “storyboard” your presentation, laying out how you will tackle your questions, and only after you have done that- add your information in. It is remarkably effective!

 

Week 6, Day 1 – Data Crunching

A day in the office, important to start gaining some more experience in how to input data into the (numerous) databases that BBOWT uses to record data. Accuracy is incredibly important as all of our data are reported back to government bodies such as Natural England to assess the state of Britain’s nature! This is obviously a cause close to my heart, and the whole of BBOWT’s!

It is also nice to spend some time in the office to get to know other members of the team better. As trainees, Ben and I have mainly been spending time with the person who would be classed as our line manager, as he has done most of our training. It is still a really lovely office, there always seems to be cake, everyone has lunch together and everyone laughs and has a good time. But unfortunately not the most interesting day to write about and take pictures of!

Week 6, Day 2 – Rapid Impact Assessment

Today we went back to Moor Copse Nature reserve for a full day of Rapid Impact Assessments. These are surveys that help you determine the health of your reserve and the success of your management by filling in a site-specific form, of species that should or should not be present.20170426_135716

This then gets transferred to a (you guessed it) database, which can them cleverly tell you whether or not the reserve is up to snuff. Things you are looking for when you complete this are the presence of key species such as Native Bluebells, and that there is less than 25% of the ground in the survey area covered in bramble. Those are just two examples, there are usually something akin to 40 criteria!

The whole reserve is sampled by splitting it into habitats ie. woodland, heathland, wetland, hay meadow etc etc, and then each habitat is surveyed in one go. We were focusing on woodland habitat, so we walked 100 paces into the wood, surveyed a 2m square, then expanded it to 15m square to fit different criteria. Walked 100 more paces did the same, until you hit a boundary. Then you walk 50 meters at a right angle, turn another 90 degrees and walk back in the original direction for 100 paces. It’s a way of making the sampling random, so then you don’t skew the sample by choosing an area with all the ground flora that you’re searching for. It probably sounds a lot more complicated than it actually is, but I found it a very interesting day. It was great to see how fast my species knowledge improved with repetition.

Aside from the slightly *ahem* dodgy goings on at Moor Copse, it really is a beautiful wood, especially for bluebells at this time of year!

 

Advertisements